Answer
  • Question: If two sets of identical twins have kids are their kids siblings? - dalekmcmuffin
  • Answer:

    edwardspoonhands:

    Gentically, the would be indistinguishable from siblings…but they would still be geneological cousins.

    EDIT - I should say “Largely indistinguishable.” A normal DNA test wouldn’t do it, but if you sequenced their whole genome, you would be able to tell which kid belonged to which couple because of random mutations. It would take a VERY BIG COMPUTER though.

Source: edwardspoonhands
Quote

"Jayanth hoped to take full advantage of the opportunities that alternate-reality storytelling presented her as a writer. The fantastical aspects of a story, “enable us to tell the kind of story we wanted to be able to tell, to redress some of the colonialism, sexism and racism of the period. If you’re inventing a world, why not make it more progressive? Why not have women invent half the technologies, and pilot half the airships? Why not shift the balance of power so that Haiti rather than barely postbellum United States is ascendant in the region? Why not have a strong automaton-using Zulu Federation avert the Scramble for Africa? Why not have characters who play with gender and sexuality without fear of reprisal? History is full of women, and people of colour, and queer people, and minorities. That part isn’t fantasy—the fantastical bit in our game is that they’re allowed to have their own stories without being silenced and attacked. That their stories are not told as if they’re exceptional.”"

Source: killscreendaily.com
Photo
s-c-i-guy:

Bill Nye Fights Back
How a mild-mannered children’s celebrity plans to save science in America—or go down swinging.
Read the full article on Popular Science

s-c-i-guy:

Bill Nye Fights Back

How a mild-mannered children’s celebrity plans to save science in America—or go down swinging.

Read the full article on Popular Science

(via theuniverseatlarge)

Source: popsci.com
Link

Some Moths are Actually Butterflies According to DNA Sequencing Study

(via invertebrate-science)

Source: insectlove
Answer
  • Question: what about Gaza and Ferguson John? do they not deserve your respect? you're such a hypocrite, i's disgusting - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    fishingboatproceeds:

    I think this is a deeply flawed way of looking at the world.

    Now, I have talked about Ferguson, and I’ve talked about Gaza. (In fact, I’ve been writing and talking about Israel and Palestine for more than a decade.) But there are many important problems facing the world that I haven’t talked about: I haven’t talked much about the civil war in South Sudan, or the epidemic of suicide among American military personnel, or the persecution of Muslim Rohingya people in Myanmar.

    Is that okay? Is it okay for me to talk about, say, racism in football and lowering infant mortality in Ethiopia? Or must we all agree to discuss only  whatever is currently the ascendant news story? Is it disrespectful to Ferguson protesters to talk about continued political oppression in Egypt now that we are no longer reblogging images of the protests in Tahrir Square? I think this is a false choice: If you are talking about Ferguson and I am talking about Ethiopian health care, neither of us is hurting the other.

    I think the challenge for activists and philanthropists online is in paying sustained attention, not over days or weeks but over years and decades. And I worry that when we turn our attention constantly from one outrage to another we end up not investing the time and work to facilitate actual change. We say “THE WORLD IS WATCHING,” and it is…until it isn’t. We’ve seen this again and again in Gaza and the West Bank. We’re seeing it in Iran. We’re seeing it in South Sudan. And we’re seeing it in the U.S., from net neutrality to Katrina recovery.

    The truth is, these problems are complicated, and when the outrage passes we’re left with big and tangled and nuanced problems. I feel that too often that’s when we stop paying attention, because it gets really hard and there’s always a shiny new problem somewhere else that’s merely outrageous. I hope you’re paying attention to Ferguson in five years, anon, and I hope I am, too. I also hope I’m paying attention to child death in Ethiopia. I don’t think these things are mutually exclusive.

    I really don’t want to minimize the effectiveness of online activism, because I know that it works: To use a personal example, I’ve learned a TON from the LGBT+ and sexual assault survivor communities in recent years online. People on tumblr make fun of me for apologizing all the time, but I apologize all the time because I am learning all the time, and every day I’m like, “Oh, man, Current Me has realized that Previous Me was so wrong about this!”

    But we can only learn when we can listen. And when you call me a hypocrite for talking about X instead of talking about Y, it makes it really hard to listen.

    At times, online discourse to me feels like we just sit in a circle screaming at each other until people get their feelings hurt and withdraw from the conversation, which leaves us with ever-smaller echo chambers, until finally we’re left only with those who entirely agree with us. I don’t think that’s how the overall worldwide level of suck gets decreased.

    I might be wrong, of course. I often am. But I think we have to find ways to embrace nuance and complexity online. It’s hard—very, very hard—to make the most generous, most accepting, most forgiving assumptions about others. But I also really do think it’s the best way forward.

Source: fishingboatproceeds
Quote

"Women don’t speak out against catcalling because they are “sanctimonious.” They speak out against it because it’s threatening and demeaning. Catcalling is terrifying specifically because it has the potential to turn into physical violence at any moment if the woman does the “wrong” thing. Writer Soraya Chemaly has documented just a few of these many news stories.

It’s disturbing that Lewak is so desperate for random men to approve of her appearance that she’s willing to take the risk that these interactions turn sour–not only that, but she’s willing to take that risk for all of us. She writes, “Oh, don’t go rolling those sanctimonious eyes at me, young women of Vassar: I may court catcalls, but I hold my head high. Enjoying male attention doesn’t make you a traitor to your gender.”

Most people who are attracted to men enjoy some sort of male attention, but not all of us enjoy it from any man, at any time, in any place. Kind of like I love pizza, but I don’t want people to shove pizza in my face every time I leave my apartment. Actually, I would probably start to kind of hate pizza if that happened, especially if trying to refuse the pizza led to slurs and threats of violence."

Source: freethoughtblogs.com
Quote

""Cutoff culture", "the friendzone": these are just neologisms used by men to mask or soften the reality that they have been – and have the right to be – rejected by women. They’re attitudes stemming from the assumption that men are owed something by women. Guys in the friendzone should be expecting sex for their kindness; otherwise what’s the point of hanging out with girls? Men whose exes broke up with them and then cut them off deserve explanations as to why, as detailed as they want, for as long as they want them – regardless of the fact that their frightening post-breakup behavior should be explanation enough. And when they’re not busy making up new words to describe their interactions with women, men with these hangups are giving existing words new meaning: "stalking" becomes "tenacity"; "pathetic public wailing" becomes a "romantic gesture"; the intense desire to not be rejected is actually the intense feeling of love."

Source: theguardian.com
Link

No skin thick enough: The daily harassment of women in the game industry

thisfeliciaday:

This article is heartbreaking. And true.

There is a reason I throttled back on doing a lot of creative gaming content a few years ago. And why I still avoid taking some jobs in the gaming world when they’re offered to me. And why, when we have a female host on any of our Geek and Sundry gaming shows, we have to monitor the comments on YouTube extra, to remove the many comments that are offensive and pollute our community’s spirit of equality. Because I hate that shit. 

There is an endemic acceptance in the gamer world that “well, it comes with the territory” when a woman receives threats and harassment and the hateful anonymous internet dialogue is focused on her body and whether they would “do” her or not. I don’t know why this became okay. It’s a vocal minority that has been given way too much power over the industry dialogue, and I am so happy to see more and more articles like this shining the light on what reasonable gamer men and women have been conned into accepting as a given.

NOTHING is a given in this world. And frankly, it taints the art form we so love and keeps it back from becoming more respected and more diverse to not at least TRY to fight it. Gaming deserves more than complacency in this area.

Even posting this link will cause me to receive hateful Tumblr PMs. I can always tell when something I write gets linked on certain places on the internet (like 4 Chan or a few other forums of troll-hood), because I’ll immediately get dozens of hate mails along the veins of what is posted in this article. 

Well, I’m a lucky one to be prominent enough to have 10 supporters for every hater. I mostly feel sorry for girls and women who aren’t in my position, who may just give up on gaming when they’re too beaten down to fight anymore.

We have to change that. For the good of what we love doing, gamers! Okay, back to work :)

(via bogleech)

Source: thisfeliciaday
Photo Set

libutron:

Zigzag fungus beetle - Erotylus incomparabilis

Aptly named Zigzag fungus beetle, Erotylus incomparabilis (Coleoptera - Erotylidae) is an unmistakable beetle because of its colorful pattern of red and yellow lines arranged transversely in zig-zag.

Also known as pleasing fungus beetles, erotylids are bound up with large fructifications of the basidiomycetes, usually growing on weakened trees or dead wood. These fungus provide the only food for both larvae and adults.

Like Almost all erotylids, the Zigzag fungus beetle shows small holes (pores) on the body-surface, interpreted (though no exact study has been undertaken) as scent-glands attracting individuals of own species or deterring enemies.

Erotylus incomparabilis has been recorded in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Arthur Anker | Locality: Ecuador (2007) | [Top] - [Bottom]

Source: libutron
Photo Set

for-science-sake:

  1. Mossy Leaf-Tailed Gecko
  2. Grey Tree Frog 
  3. Grey Cicada 
  4. Casque head Chameleon 
  5. Lichen Spider
  6. Underwing Moth
  7. Peppered Moth
  8. Owl Fly Larva
  9. Eastern Screech Owl 

(via cephalopodqueen)

Source: for-science-sake