Quote

"We are all teachers, just as we are all students. Life is what we teach and life is what we learn. So when we’re open to learning from others, we open ourselves up to a particular flavor of knowledge that only that specific person can give us. If we’re open to this kind of learning then we are polymaths by default. This can be a magical experience."

Source: fourteendrawings
Link

What the autism spectrum is and isn't.

blaiyrwitch:

Social skills: noticing when repetition is communication

realsocialskills:

So there’s this dynamic:

Autistic person: The door is open!

Other person: I *know* that. It’s hot in here.

Autistic person: The door is open!

Other person: I already explained to you that…

Source: realsocialskills
Link

http://edwardspoonhands.com/post/93020596322/cochleandus-im-not-saying-anything-but-my

cochleandus:

i’m not saying anything but my absolute favorite hank videos are the

YOU ARE A HUMAN BEING AND THAT MAKES YOU STUPID AND DEPENDENT ON CULTURE AND SELFISH AND BIASED AND FLAWED BUT IT ALSO MAKES YOU UNIQUE AND CREATIVE AND FASCINATING AND MANY-SPLENDORED AND LOVABLE AND AWESOME

Source: cochleandus
Photo

rhamphotheca:

Semen Says:

Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.

by Rina Shaikh-Lesko

Although copulation is often brief, males of many animal species leave a lasting impression on their mates. The seminal fluid they deposit contains not just sperm, but proteins that can alter the physiology and behavior of the female, often in ways that hurt the paternal success of her subsequent mates.

Among hermaphrodites—animals with both male and female reproductive organs—mates themselves are potential competitors, too, and copulation gives seminal fluid proteins the unique opportunity to directly manipulate the recipient’s male as well as female function.

Ovipostatin, a seminal fluid protein (SFP) in the hermaphroditic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, cuts egg production in half in the sperm recipient, according to a 2010 study led by Joris Koene of VU University Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

It’s been theorized that SFPs might also affect the sperm-producing capacity of recipient snails—their maleness—to reduce competition within a population. “It had been predicted … more than 30 years ago, but no one had properly tested it,” says Koene…

(read more: The Scientist)

illustration: © Scott Leighton

(via libutron)

Source: rhamphotheca
Quote

"Listening to the timbre of the conversations at the Dane County Farmers Market, one of the largest in the country, you’d think the topic was vaccination or Gaza. “What exactly is in this scone?” “Are your emus happy? How much space do they have to roam free?” “When you say ‘flour’ on the label, what kind of flour is that?”

Yet food pantries remain full of the same canned pumpkin and expired boxed meals they always have. Obese people are shamed and told what to eat, while people deemed skinny enough to have an eating disorder are also shamed for not taking care of their “health.” There is a serious disconnect here that should tell anyone who’s paying attention that this is not about justice or health in any form––it is about vanity.

When asking the server how the animal being served was prepared, no one seems to wonder whether that server has basic health insurance or whether that server is affected by the fact that the restaurant industry has one of the highest rates of sexual harassment and lowest rates of pay. When waxing poetic about the “salt of the Earth” farmers from which they buy their unpasteurized milk, no one seems to worry that an estimated 10 percent of American farm workers are children. When pearl-clutching over the things we “don’t know” about GMOs, as Kavin pointed out, no one seems to be concerned about their presence in groceries found at Price Rite––only products sold at Whole Foods.

If you are not as concerned about the people handing you your food in the restaurant as you are about the pigs on the farm where it was grown, your approach is classist….If you start telling someone all about your new trendy diet or asking them about theirs without knowing if they have an eating disorder that may be triggered by your prattle, your approach is ableist. If you tsk-tsk at people who are overweight for what they are eating and claim you’re concerned about their health, yet you’re not actively campaigning to make healthy food more accessible and affordable, your approach is sickening and I don’t want you in my activism."

Source: skepchick.org
Link

You are not alone

bessibels:

youneedacat:

realsocialskills:

If you are being hurt by a person, they’re likely trying to convince you that no one else could possibly understand your relationship.

If you’re being hurt by your family, they’re likely trying to convince you that no one else could…

Source: realsocialskills
Photo

femmenace-t:

pervocracy:

postwhitesociety:

hm

I think the “women are mysterious” thing can also come from:

1) Women actually being quite clear, but not telling men what they want to hear.  ”She said she doesn’t want to talk to me?  So many mixed messages and confusing signals!”

2) Women not having cheat codes.  ”I tried being nice, and she didn’t have sex with me.  I tried being an asshole, and she didn’t have sex with me.  Come on, there’s got to be some kind of solution to this puzzle!”

3) Women not being a hive mind.  ”First a woman told me that she likes guys with big muscles.  Then the very next day a woman told me she thinks muscles aren’t attractive at all.  Make up your mind, women!”

4) An individual woman doing something confusing, and instead of asking “why is she doing this now?” men ask “why do women always do this?”

Always reblog

(via brutereason)

Source: ethiopienne
Photo Set

brutereason:

These are from a wonderful book called The Art Of Comforting. Check it out and learn how to be better at supporting people going through difficult things.

Source: brutereason
Photo Set

fishingboatproceeds:

A health center in Southcentral Ethiopia that provides 24/7 emergency care to over 5,000 people living in rural areas. The health center is where many women deliver their babies, where you can get contraception (including Depo implants), and where a variety of illnesses are tested and treated. There’s also a lab with a hand-cranked blood centrifuge and a microscope where a lab technician types malaria and pneumonia infections.

In the first photograph, you can see Abdul, who leads this health center, explaining local disease rates to Bill Gates.

The second photograph gives you a sense of the health center itself (which has no running water and very little electricity). The third picture is the view from the health center of the huts where nearby families live.

The bottom picture charts under-5 mortality since 2004, when these health centers opened (along with the more rural health outposts, which I posted about here). The red line is Ethiopia; the gray line the world average.

In 2004, more than 11% of children born in Ethiopia died before five; today, it’s less than 7%. And as you can see, every year since 2004, the under-5 mortality rate has fallen faster in Ethiopia than it has in the world overall. Now, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but both the patients and health workers I spoke to agreed these rural health centers are working. 

(It’s also worth noting that Ethiopia’s under-5 mortality rate has dropped far faster than other nations, even those that spend much more on health. In Nigeria, for instance, 12% of kids still die before the age of 5; Pakistan, which is far richer than Ethiopia, has barely seen its under-5 mortality drop at all in the past decade. So the world has a lot to learn from Ethiopia’s health investments.) 

Source: fishingboatproceeds
Photo Set

griseus:

PORCELAIN CRABS FROM CHILE

Porcelanids are decapod (with 10 legs) crustaceans in the widespread family Porcellanidae, which superficially resemble true crabs. They have flattened bodies as an adaptation for living in rock crevices. They are delicate, readily losing limbs when attacked, and use their large claws for maintaining territories.

Photograph by Arthur Anker

  • Allopetrolisthes spinifrons
  • Allopetrolisthes angulosus
  • Petrolisthes laevigatus
  • Lipetrolisthes mitra
  • Alopetrolisthes punctatus
  • Petrolisthes violaceus
  • Petrolisthes tuberculatus

(via libutron)

Source: griseus